Flânuering in Frankston

I recently had the good fortune to  stay overnight in a suburb called Frankston. While not that distant from where I live, it is far enough away to be out of the way. I haven’t walked the streets of this shopping precinct in Frankston for more years than I can remember. I in fact I may have never walked this part of Frankston. But I spent an hour or two wandering the CBD of this bayside suburb.

To say I was pleasantly surprised would be putting it mildly. I only have vague recollections of the shopping centre. It is now serviced by all the major food chains and there was lot s of pedestrian friendly “open” space.

I have to admit it’s rare that I feel a tourist in Melbourne, but here I was in Frankston feeling completely foreign; like the proverbial ‘fish out of water’. Nonetheless I could not help myself and wander about and grab a few images that caught my eye. As is often the case I found the small laneways and backstreets the most compelling.

Here’s a series of pictures I thought looked interesting.

a collection of dumped or abandoned chairs in a laneway in Frankston
a collection of dumped or abandoned chairs in a laneway in Frankston
Backs of older buildings often have more interesting things to see.
Backs of older buildings often have more interesting things to see.
Murals everywhere, is it street art though?
Murals everywhere, is it street art though?
The train station precinct in Frankston
The train station precinct in Frankston, surprisingly quiet for 8:00am on a Tuesday.
A red sign indicating the direction of the beach
A red sign indicating the direction of the beach amongst the pedestrianised area south of the Train station.

 

When these pictures make it to flickr, they will be titled with their exact time, and include geotag coordinates.

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Street Art?

abstraction #20200117105431

I listened to this ABC broadcast about Street and and Graffiti. this morning

“Street artists, advertising agencies and the authorities are in the middle of a space race.

It’s a lot less about little green men and much more about spray paint and stencils. But the stakes are still sky high. Artists are busy commandeering as many city surfaces as their paints will allow, authorities are trying to neutralise the threat, while advertising agencies are keen to clone the potency of hand painted art.”

I have a small series of work that looks at much more ephemeral art of peeling advertising posters. Which is a kind of street art.


About the author.
Stuart Murdoch is an Artist and Part time Photo Educator, with over 30 years of teaching experience. He contemplates many things photographic. His ruminations include his own work as well other’s and the aspects of technology that impact on the sharing and consumption of Photographs. And of course the act of making and taking photographs in the 21st century.

☛ Website | Flickr | Instagram | Photography links | s2z digital garden | Tumblr